Anglo-Saxon(ist) Pasts, postSaxon Futures

FORTHCOMING Summer 2019

Over the past several years, Anglo-Saxon studies—alongside the larger field of medieval studies—has undergone a reckoning. Outcries against the misogyny and sexism of prominent figures in the field have quickly turned to issues of racism, prompting Anglo-Saxonists to recognize an institutional, structural whiteness that not only bars the door to people of color but also[…]

The Bodies That Remain

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Published: 10/16/2018

Read an Excerpt from The Bodies That Remain Here! The Bodies That Remain is a collection of bodies and absences. Through biography, experimental essay, interview, fictional manifestation, and poetic extraction, The Bodies That Remain is a collection of texts and images on the bodies of artists and writers who battled with the frustration of their[…]

Trouble Songs: A Musicological Poetics

Published: 03/26/2018

Read an Excerpt from Trouble Songs Here! Trouble Songs is a hybrid serial work that tracks the appearance of the word “trouble” in 20th- and 21st-century American music. It reads (and sings) songs and poems, with reference to cultural events ranging from the death of a pop singer to the growth of popular resistance movements. The[…]

Ostranenie: On Shame and Knowing

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Published: 12/24/2012

Ostranenie, the term for defamiliarization introduced by Russian writer and critic Victor Shklovsky, means, among other things, to see in strangeness. To see in strangeness is to participate in an illusion that is more real than real. It may be achieved by (re)presenting the surface as the substance, the play as the thing, or by[…]

Writing Death

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Published: 06/06/2011

Writing Death opens a meditation on the possibility of mourning; of whether there is a subject, or even object, that one mourns—of whether one is mourning, can only mourn, the very impossibility of mourning itself. The manuscript is framed by two attempts at mourning—Avital Ronell’s “The Tactlessness of an Unending Fadeout” and Jeremy Fernando’s “adieu.” In-between—for[…]