Anthropocene Unseen: A Lexicon

FORTHCOMING Winter 2019

The idea of the Anthropocene often generates an overwhelming sense of abjection or apathy. It occupies the imagination as a set of circumstances that counterpose individual human actors against ungraspable scales and impossible odds. There is much at stake in how we understand the implications of this planetary imagination, and how to plot paths from[…]

Shadowing the Anthropocene: Eco-Realism for Turbulent Times

Published: 10/09/2018

Read an Excerpt from Shadowing the Anthropocene Here! A spectre is haunting humanity: the spectre of a reality that will outwit and, in the end, bury us. “The Anthropocene,” or The Human Era, is an attempt to name our geological fate – that we will one day disappear into the layer-cake of Earth’s geology –[…]

Vital Reenchantments: Biophilia, Gaia, Cosmos, and the Affectively Ecological

Published: 01/16/2019

Read a Excerpt from Vital Reenchantments Here! Not all charms fly at the touch of cold philosophy. Vital Reenchantments examines so-called cold philosophy, or science, that does precisely the opposite — rather than mercilessly emptying out and unweaving, it operates as a philosophy that animates. More specifically, this book closely examines how a specific group of[…]

Covert Plants: Vegetal Consciousness and Agency in an Anthropocentric World

Imprint:

Published: 09/11/2018

Covert Plants contributes to newly emerging discourses on the implications of vegetal life for the arts and culture. This stretches to changes in our perception of ‘nature’ and to the adapting roles of botany, evolutionary ecology, and environmental aesthetics in the humanities. Its editors and contributors seek various expressions of vegetal life rather than the[…]

Sea Monsters: Things from the Sea, Volume 2

Imprint:

Published: 09/29/2017

Read an Excerpt from Sea Monsters Here! Beaches are places that give and take, bringing unexpected surprises to society, and pulling essentials away from it. Through monsters, we confront our tiny time between catastrophes and develop a recognition of Otherness by which an ethical understanding of difference becomes possible. Learning to read the monster’s environmental[…]

Posthuman Lear: Reading Shakespeare in the Anthropocene

Published: 02/26/2016

Part scholarship, part journalism, part ecological screed, this book may read like a mashup of critical perspectives. Like other current investigations into the ecological significance of early modern literature, the account of King Lear offered here draws on different and sometimes contrasting interpretive methods: cognitive science, evolutionary psychology, literary historicism and what is called the new materialism. Moreover, the book reflects on the broad global setting of eco-materialism’s themes of catastrophe and enmeshed co-existence, using contemporary examples from Japan, New Mexico, Finland, and India, all while jumping back to Shakespeare’s early modern England. … Those interested in ecology might not be interested in the history of Renaissance literacy. And those interested in the scholarship on Shakespeare’s King Lear might not be interested in accounts of tsunami stones or radioactive waste sites. But they should be. … Because the proverbial clock is ticking. What Hamlet said about readiness? Well, it’s happening. The sparrow has already fallen.

~Craig Dionne, Posthuman Lear

Oceanic New York

Published: 09/18/2015

This volume comprises a three-fold object, Book and Ocean and New York City. If this Book were Ocean, how would it feel between your fingers? Wet and slippery, just a bit warmer or colder than the air around it, since the Ocean is our planet’s greatest reservoir of heat, a sloshing insulator and incubator girdling[…]