How We Read: Tales, Fury, Nothing, Sound

Imprint:

Published: 07/18/2019

What do we do when we read? Reading can be an act of consumption or an act of creation. Our “work reading” overlaps with our “pleasure reading,” and yet these two modes of reading engage with different parts of the self. It is sometimes passive, sometimes active, and can even be an embodied form. The[…]

Mythodologies: Methods in Medieval Studies, Chaucer, and Book History

Published: 05/31/2018

Read an Excerpt from Mythodologies Here! Mythodologies challenges the implied methodology in contemporary studies in the humanities. We claim, at times, that we gather facts or what we will call evidence, and from that form hypotheses and conclusions. Of course, we recognize that the sum total of evidence for any argument is beyond comprehension; therefore,[…]

The Ballad of the Lone Medievalist

Published: 08/23/2018

Read an Excerpt from The Ballad of the Lone Medievalist Here! Are you a Lone Medievalist? Working medievalists are often the only scholar of the Middle Ages in a department, a university, or a hundred-mile radius. While working to build a body of focused scholarly work, the lone medievalist is expected to be a generalist[…]

Sea Monsters: Things from the Sea, Volume 2

Imprint:

Published: 09/29/2017

Read an Excerpt from Sea Monsters Here! Beaches are places that give and take, bringing unexpected surprises to society, and pulling essentials away from it. Through monsters, we confront our tiny time between catastrophes and develop a recognition of Otherness by which an ethical understanding of difference becomes possible. Learning to read the monster’s environmental[…]

An Open Letter of Concern to the Medieval Academy of America

by Eileen Joy Responses to the website of prominent Anglo-Saxonist Allen Frantzen (Loyola University, Emeritus) have generated a wide conversation, centering especially on the need for what we might call ‘truth and reconciliation’ in the field of academic medieval studies, conducted in person, by phone, and on social media (which was also partly sparked by[…]

Illegitimate

Figure 1. still image from Woody Allen’s Everyone Says I Love You (1996) by EILEEN JOY I am recently returned from the 4th Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group, held at the University of Toronto (Oct. 9-11; see full program HERE), where I participated as a speaker on a session co-organized by Craig Dionne[…]

How We Write

Imprint:

Published: 09/11/2015

The contributors range from graduate students and recent PhDs to senior scholars working in the fields of medieval studies, art history, English literature, poetics, early modern studies, musicology, and geography. All are engaged in academic writing, but some of the contributors also publish in other genres, includes poetry and fiction. Several contributors maintain a very[…]

Still Thriving

Imprint:

Published: 04/09/2015

The work of L.O. Aranye Fradenburg, especially her psychoanalytic criticism of Chaucer, and her formulations of discontinuist historical approaches to the Middle Ages, has been extremely influential within medieval studies for the past 20 or so years. More recently she has been focusing on more broad defenses of the humanities, especially with regard to the[…]