Other Grounds: Breaking Free of the Correlationist Circle

Published: 09/26/2016

Is there any possibility of a fresh and concrete research into the secret contours of objects? ~ Graham Harman, Towards Speculative Realism I would venture to suggest that even the meagre amount of knowledge of the use of the self contained in these pages may be sufficient to enable workers in all fields of investigation,[…]

Speculations III

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Published: 09/03/2012

In this third volume of Speculations, a serial imprint created to explore post-continental philosophy and speculative realism, a wide range of topics are covered, from the philosophy of religion to psychoanalysis to the philosophy of science to gender studies, and in a wide variety of formats (articles, interviews, position pieces, translations, and review essays). TABLE[…]

After the “Speculative Turn”: Realism, Philosophy, and Feminism

Published: 10/26/2016

Read an Excerpt — Nina Power’s chapter on “Philosophy, Sexism, Emotion, Rationalism”! Recent forms of realism in continental philosophy that are habitually subsumed under the category of “speculative realism,” a denomination referring to rather heterogeneous strands of philosophy, bringing together object-oriented ontology (OOO), non-standard philosophy (or non-philosophy), the speculative realist ideas of Quentin Meillassoux and Marxism, have provided[…]

Posthuman Lear

Published: 02/26/2016

Part scholarship, part journalism, part ecological screed, this book may read like a mashup of critical perspectives. Like other current investigations into the ecological significance of early modern literature, the account of King Lear offered here draws on different and sometimes contrasting interpretive methods: cognitive science, evolutionary psychology, literary historicism and what is called the new materialism. Moreover, the book reflects on the broad global setting of eco-materialism’s themes of catastrophe and enmeshed co-existence, using contemporary examples from Japan, New Mexico, Finland, and India, all while jumping back to Shakespeare’s early modern England. … Those interested in ecology might not be interested in the history of Renaissance literacy. And those interested in the scholarship on Shakespeare’s King Lear might not be interested in accounts of tsunami stones or radioactive waste sites. But they should be. … Because the proverbial clock is ticking. What Hamlet said about readiness? Well, it’s happening. The sparrow has already fallen.

~Craig Dionne, Posthuman Lear

Speculative Objectivity

FORTHCOMING Autumn 2017

The aim of this book is to expound a new philosophy of history, which Michael J. Kelly refers to as ‘speculative objectivity.’ Working through speculative realism, object-oriented ontology and studies of the post-human, Kelly hopes to overcome the traditional paradigm of historical objectivity and its logically false displacement by historical subjectivity. Re-negotiating the positions of[…]

Speculations V: Aesthetics in the 21st Century

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Published: 05/15/2014

Ever since the turn of the century aesthetics has steadily gained momentum as a central field of study across the disciplines. No longer sidelined, aesthetics has grown in confidence. While this recent development brings with it a return to the work of the canonical authors (most notably Baumgarten and Kant), some contemporary scholars reject the[…]

A Feeling for Things

FORTHCOMING Spring 2015

  The work of the political theorist Jane Bennett over the last two decades has consistently drawn attention to and has possessed a feeling for things, for the inorganic, and for the agency or quasi-agency of nonhuman actants. Her project of developing a new political ecology and renewed vitalist thought, beginning with Thoreau’s Nature: Ethics,[…]

An Object-Oriented Ontology© on Amphetamines and Psilocybin: Neomedievalist Theory-Fiction Is Here

by EILEEN JOY At last, the rival Confraternity of SpeculativeRealism® has its missing subject! Here, the human-object/thing sits still-as-stone, dis-connected from one regime in order to connect to another. As such, this book is a contribution to Thing Theory, but of a very queer and wonky kind. An object-oriented ontology© on amphetamines and psilocybin. (Simon[…]